Protest Stickers: Liverpool

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The Beatles are Liverpool’s most famous export (Photo: Hannah Awcock).

Since I have become an honourary Northerner, I have had the chance to explore some of the North’s cities. Liverpool is a great city, a fascinating mix of industrial decay, glossy redevelopment, and creativity. It has grown on me very quickly, not least because of all the stickers I have found there.

One thing that stands out about Liverpool’s stickers is the large number advertising various escort services– I have never seen so many in any other city I’ve been to! I wouldn’t like to suggest why that might be, but it’s certainly an interesting trend. Another reason Liverpool’s stickers stand out is that they made the national news recently when a feminist group called Liverpool ReSisters put anti-trans penis-shaped stickers (featured below) on Anthony Gormley’s sculptures on Crosby beach.

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96 Liverpool fans were killed during the Hillsborough Disaster on 15th April 1989. The Sun newspaper is still unpopular for the way it blamed the fans for what happened (Photo: Hannah Awcock, 03/09/18).

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Anti-fascist groups are some of the most common producers of protest stickers. This one is produced by the Merseyside Anti-fascist Network, and uses the animation style of the popular cartoon Rick and Morty (Photo: Hannah Awcock, 10/06/18).

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This sticker was also produced by the Merseyside Anti-fascist Network. The logo of two overlapping flags is a common anti-fascist symbol, but this group have given it a local spin by adding a Liver Bird, one of Liverpool’s most famous symbols (Photo: Hannah Awcock, 10/06/18).

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Anti-fascist groups don’t just put up stickers in their local areas, they also put them up when they travel. This sticker was made by the North London Anti-fascists (Photo: Hannah Awcock, 10/06/18).

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Antifaschistische Aktion is a German anti-fascist network, suggesting this sticker has come from even further afield (Photo: Hannah Awcock, 09/03/18).

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Migration is one of the most controversial topics in British politics at the moment. This sticker was produced by the International Workers of the World, an international union that has been around since 1905 (Photo: Hannah Awcock, 03/09/18).

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This sticker has a similar message, but was produced by a different group. Global Justice Now works to create a more equal world, launched in 1967 (Photo: Hannah Awcock, 10/06/18).

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This sticker is part of a series where members of Marvel’s superhero team the Avengers confront prominent politicians. The stickers are quite old, going back to at least 2015, so some of the politicians they feature are in different positions now. George Osborne, for example, is no longer Chancellor of the Exchequer, which is the context in which this sticker was produced. The sticker is advertising Another Angry Voice, a political opinion blog. (Photo: Hannah Awcock, 10/06/18).

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Feminist issues are a common topic of protest stickers. This sticker refers to the debate about whether women are ever even partially responsible when they are sexual assaulted, because of their clothes or behaviour.  This sticker was produced by Active Distribution, a radical publishing group that sells protest stickers, amongst many other things (Photo: Hannah Awcock, 10/06/18).

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This sticker relates to a controversial issue within modern feminism about whether or not transgender people should be able to self-identify as women. Some women view transgender women as just another example of sexist oppression. This is the sticker that made national news recently when it was put on the Anthony Gormley sculptures on Crosby beach (Photo: Hannah Awcock: 03/09/18).

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This sticker commemorates British people who have died fighting for the People’s Protection Units (YPG) in the Syrian Civil War. The YPG is the armed wing of the Kurdish left-wing Democratic Union Party. The Kurdish text translates as “Martyrs don’t die.” The sticker is obviously quite recent; Anna Campbell, the only woman on the sticker, was killed in Afrin in Northern Syria on 15th March 2018. It is an unusual sticker, I have never seen on related to this issue before (Photo: Hannah Awcock, 10/06/18).

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Animal rights, vegetarianism, and veganism is another common topic of protest stickers. It is not clear who produced this sticker, although the logo does (probably unintentionally) remind me of the X-factor. (Photo: Hannah Awcock, 10/06/18).

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It is also not clear who produced this sticker. It is informing people of their rights if the police use Stop and Search powers–you have no legal obligation to provide your name or address. It is an interesting design, but I don’t no how effective it is as a protest sticker. It took me a few seconds to figure out that the main text reads “No Comment,” and I doubt most people would put as much effort into reading it as I did (Photo: Hannah Awcock, 10/06/18).

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I saved this sticker for last because it is my favourite sticker for quite some time, I like the clever design. Stand Up to Racism is a campaign group formed in response to the increasing racism and xenophobic politics around the world (Photo: Hannah Awcock, 10/06/18).

 

London’s Protest Stickers: Immigration and Race 2

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Immigration and racism have been a key issue for activists in London in recent years (Photo: Hannah Awcock, 09/10/16, Whitechapel High Street).

In recent years, events such as the migrant crisis in the Mediterranean and Brexit have made immigration and race particularly contentious issues in Britain. As I have discussed before, London is no stranger to immigration; the city would be a very different place without it. Unfortunately, it is also no stranger to xenophobia, racism, and anti-migrant sentiments, as some of the stickers below demonstrate. However, there are groups, social movements, and activists who are willing to defend the rights of migrants and ethnic minorities in Britain, as most of the stickers below will show.

To see where the protest stickers in this post were located, check out the Turbulent London Map.

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Most protest stickers represent left-wing points of view, but there are some that promote particularly nasty politics. These next few stickers are all of this type. When I went back the next day, this one had been removed, suggesting that I’m not the only one that found it unpleasant (Photo: Hannah Awcock, 02/06/16, Euston Road).

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The text of this sticker has been obscured by water damage, but the first half says “When Tibet is full of Chinese it’s genocide.” I’m not sure what the second half says, but it implies that there is a similar situation in North America and Europe, but it’s called diversity (Photo: Hannah Awcock, 02/06/16, Euston Road).

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I suspect that the last three stickers were all made by the same people/person, given they have the same message, similar design, and were all located in close proximity (Photo: 03/06/15, Great Portland Street).

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This sticker was made by an anti-fascist group, and the slogan is quite common amongst anti-fascist stickers, although the image varies (Photo: Hannah Awcock, 09/10/16, Cable Street).

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United Glasgow FC is a football team that aims to make the sport accessible and bring communities together to all by keeping costs down and combating discrimination. At some point one of them, or their supporters, came to London and put up a sticker (Photo: Hannah Awcock, 09/10/16, Cable Street).

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This sticker has a very simple design, but I think it’s effective. It also doesn’t provide any clues as to who produced it, suggesting that the message was more important to whoever produced it than promoting a particular group or campaign (Photo: Hannah Awcock, 23/03/17, Charing Cross Road).

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Stand Up to Racism is a fairly self-explanatory organisation. This sticker is promoting their national day of action in 2017. They also organise national conferences, and smaller protests and campaigns on specific issues. Recently, they have been campaigning against the popular neo-fascist leader, Tommy Robinson, and the Democratic Football Lads Alliance, which they accuse of being racist (Photo: Hannah Awcock, 20/03/16, New Cross Road).

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This sticker on Euston Road is another example of a simple, effective message (Photo: Hannah Awcock, 23/03/17, Euston Road).

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This slogan has become a common refrain amongst those campaigning against the handling of the European migrant crisis. If there were no borders, then there would be no illegal immigrants, and there would be no need for fences to keep them out (Photo: Hannah Awcock, 09/10/16, Whitechapel High Street).

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The UK Border Agency has come under fire in recent years for the immigration raids it conducts across London. A movement has grown up that seeks to counter the raids in a variety of ways, including publicising the movements  of the UKBA on social media, so it is harder for them to make surprise raids (Photo: Hannah Awcock, 09/10/16, St. George’s Gardens).

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Sisters Uncut is an organisation that campaigns against cuts to services related to domestic violence (see London’s Protest Stickers: Gender). Here, they are expressing solidarity for another vulnerable group. Migrant women are also particularly susceptible to domestic violence (Photo: Hannah Awcock, 12/10/17, Regent’s Canal).

 

Protest Stickers: New Orleans

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Someone got creative with this road sign in New Orleans (Photo: Hannah Awcock).

A few months ago, I was lucky enough to go to New Orleans. It’s a city I have always wanted to visit, and it more than lived up to my expectations. It is a vibrant city, full of excellent music, good food, and wonderful people. New Orleans is not without its problems however; the city has become increasingly segregated since Hurricane Katrina in 2005, and it has an uneasy relationship with one of its most important industries, tourism (I wrote about the problems with AirBnB in New Orleans here). However, it doesn’t seem to be a city that shies away from it’s problems. The protest stickers I found suggest that New Orleans is a city with a healthy political culture, and I’m certain it’s people will never stop trying to make it a better place.

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Every so often, I find stickers that other people have altered in some way, either by writing on them or scratching parts off. I found quite a few in New Orleans, suggesting that people might take notice of stickers more there than in other cities. The message of this sticker has been altered to mean the complete opposite of what was originally intended. I’m not sure what it’s referring too, but I found the sticker on Bourbon Street, infamous party street and now major tourist trap. There are several strip clubs on Bourbon Street, and strip clubs are an issue that divides feminists, so it could be about that, but it could also be about something completely different (Photo: Hannah Awcock).

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With some careful scratching, this sticker has been transformed from anti-fascist to pro-fascist (Photo: Hannah Awcock).

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The message of this sticker has been almost entirely obscured. However, I found the same sticker in other places, so I know that the missing words are “Putin’s penis” (Photo: Hannah Awcock).

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It is not clear, but this sticker has been altered to read “Trump is an asset.” As much as I disagree with the altered sticker, I can’t help thinking it’s quite a clever edit. However, it looks as if someone else might have tried to scribble out this altered message too (Photo: Hannah Awcock).

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The American President Donald Trump was the subject of quite a few of the stickers I found. Unsurprising really, as calling him a controversial figure would be a major understatement (Photo: Hannah Awcock).

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This one is a little more subtle in its critique (Photo: Hannah Awcock).

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This sticker makes use of the popular cartoon Rick and Morty to criticise Trump (Photo: Hannah Awcock).

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I think this sticker is particularly clever. The building behind the crime scene tape is the White House (Photo: Hannah Awcock).

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Another popular topic of protest stickers in New Orleans was the police. The message of this one is pretty clear (Photo: Hannah Awcock).

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Throughout history, the policing of nightlife has often caused tension between authorities and citizens, particularly minority groups (Photo: Hannah Awcock).

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This sticker plays with the concept of Neighbourhood Watch areas, which is where the logo comes from. The real Neighbourhood Watch programme in the US is run by the National Sheriff’s Association though, so I doubt the anti-police message comes from them. This sticker was made by a group called CrimethInc., an anarchist alliance (Photo: Hannah Awcock).

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ACAB is a popular anti-police acronym, it stands for All Cops are Bastards. In the case of this sticker, though, it also means something less contentious (Photo: Hannah Awcock).

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This sticker also hides it’s anti-policing message by giving a different meaning to ACAB. It’s still a relatively subversive message, though; autonomous communities govern themselves, without any outside interference (Photo:Hannah Awcock).

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This sticker adapts the “Refugees Welcome” slogan and symbol that has become popular since the refugee crisis began a few years ago (Photo: Hannah Awcock).

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This is more of a poster than a sticker, but I liked it, so decided to leave it in. Someone tried to remove it, but the message is still clear (Photo: Hannah Awcock).

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This sticker links capitalism and climate change, and I think it is quite effective (Photo: Hannah Awcock).

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The Equitable Food Initiative claims to work across the food supply chain to get a better deal for farm workers, but it seems someone disapproves. I wasn’t able to find out anything about why that might be (Photo: Hannah Awcock).

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I mentioned the debate over strip clubs earlier, and this sticker was obviously produced by someone who likes stripping, for whatever reason (Photo: Hannah Awcock).

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This sticker was produced by the ACLU (American Civil Liberties Union) which works to defend individual rights and liberties in the US (Photo: Hannah Awcock).

London’s Protest Stickers: Work

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Stickers of all kinds are common in urban areas (Photo: Hannah Awcock, King’s Cross Station, 27/02/16 ).

Since austerity began a decade ago, people in all forms have employment have had to endure a fall in their working conditions. Issues include reductions in pensions, reductions in pay, increased workload, and the rise of zero-hour and fixed term contracts.

There are a number of groups that campaign for improved working conditions and better wages. Most of them are unions, although working conditions and wages are also the concern of campaign groups and social movements. Unions range in size; from the very large and powerful, such as Unite and the National Union of Teachers, to the small and specific. Many unions in the UK are part of the Trades Union Congress, which offers support to unions and campaigns for the rights of working people. Many of these organisations can be found amongst the work-related protest stickers on London’s streets.

To see where I found these stickers, check out the Turbulent London map.

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Some protest stickers related to work are quite general, like this one. This sticker was produced by Strike! a dissident female-run collective that publishes a quarterly magazine (Photo: Hannah Awcock, Bethnal Green Road, 13/09/15).

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This sticker links wages with quality of work. I’m not sure that many people in low-paid work would feel confident enough to take this kind of action, out of fear of losing their jobs completely. The text is yellow is the same message in Polish. Workers from Poland and other countries in eastern Europe are often blamed for low wages, but many radical groups understand the need for solidarity with non-British workers, rather than their victimisation. This sticker was produced by Workers Wild West, a worker’s newspaper based in Ealing in West London (Photo: Hannah Awcock, Cable Street, 09/10/16)

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This sticker was produced by the Communist Party of Great Britain (Marxist-Leninist) (CPGN-ML). The 1st of May is celebrated as a holiday in many cultures, but it has been closely associated with the international worker’s movement for more than a century. It seems that someone disapproved of the image of Lenin on this sticker, and tried to remove it (Photo: Hannah Awcock, Charing Cross Road, 23/03/17).

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Unison is the UK’s largest union for public services, with 1.3 million members. The living wage, which is higher than the minimum wage, is an important issue in places like London, where the cost of living is so high (Photo: Hannah Awcock, 18/08/15 Mile End Road).

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The bigger unions are often organised into local branches. This sticker was produced by Camden Unison, and advertises a strike by traffic wardens in the area. The sticker is designed to look like a parking fine ticket–I’m not sure many drivers would find it amusing! (Photo: Hannah Awcock, 03/09/15, Euston Road).

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The Solidarity Federation is not a union, it is the British branch of the International Worker’s Association. They support the formation of local groups and networks in order to form a worldwide solidarity movement (Photo: Hannah Awcock, 09/10/16, St George’s Garden).

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This sticker was produced by the Fire Brigades Union, which is fairly self-explanatory. In 2015, when this photo was taken, they were in a dispute with the government over plans for firefighter’s pensions, which led to strike action (Photo: Hannah Awcock, 12/03/15, Malet Street).

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This sticker was produced by the RMT union (otherwise known as the National Union of Rail, Maritime and Transport Workers) represents workers from all sectors of the transport industry. It has been in the news a lot recently, because of conflicts over the use of guards on trains (Photo: Hannah Awcock, 14/04/15 Upper Street, Islington).

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This sticker was produced by the Wirral branch of the TUC. The politician Esther McVey was the Minister of State for employment between 2013 and 2015. Zero hour contracts, where the number of hours workers are given each week are not guaranteed, are another controversial development of recent years (Photo: Hannah Awcock, 15/04/15, Euston Road).

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PCS is the Public and Commercial Services Union, representing employees in the civil service and government agencies. (Photo: Hannah Awcock, 18/02/15, Inner London Crown Court).

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The GMB began life in 1889 as the Gas Workers and General Union. It is not a general union, which means anyone can join, no matter how they make their living. This sticker is demanding the minimum wage rise to £10 an hour (Photo: Hannah Awcock, 18/10/16, Broad Sanctuary).

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This sticker is also calling for a £10/hr minimum wage. It is produced by the Bakers Food and Allied Workers Union, hence the pun that the sticker uses (Photo: Hannah Awcock, 23/03/17, Euston Road).

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This sticker does not promote a particular campaign group or union. The text at the bottom of the sticker is Spanish for “the fight continues!” Cleaners are often very poorly paid. I found this sticker near the University of London buildings in Bloomsbury, which has been the focus of a campaign in recent years over the rights of cleaners. Many employers subcontract out work such as cleaning, which frequently results in low pay and poor working conditions (Photo: Hannah Awcock, 09/02/15, Gordon Street).

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Unless this sticker was produced by a rap group or a clothing label, I haven’t been able to figure out who ‘Foreign Boyz’ are. Whoever they are, they oppose zero hour contracts (Photo: Hannah Awcock, 21/09/17, Tottenham Court Road).

 

 

Protest Stickers: Preston

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(Photo: Hannah Awcock).

I have recently moved to Preston in Lancashire. I’ve never lived further north than London before, so it’s a big change for me, but I’ve really enjoyed getting to know the city, its people (suffragette Edith Rigby was a particularly cool Prestonian), and the University of Central Lancashire. I think protest stickers are a really good way to get to know a place, because it gives you an indication of the issues that matter to local and visiting activists. The number of protest stickers you find also gives you an idea of how radical a city is. Considering Preston’s size, I’ve been pleasantly surprised by the number of protest stickers I have found.

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Like many larger towns and cities, Preston has an anti-fascist group. The lamb has been a symbol of Preston for several hundred years (Photo: Hannah Awcock, Stoneygate, 14/06/18).

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It is also common to find stickers produced by anti-fascist groups from elsewhere, such as this sticker from Manchester (Photo: Hannah Awcock, Friargate, 23/02/18).

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Due to it’s proximity to Liverpool, feelings about the Hillsborough disaster and the Sun newspaper’s coverage of it are quite strong in Preston (Photo: Hannah Awcock, Fishergate, 28/05/18).

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Preston is home to the University of Central Lancashire, and as such has a significant student population. Lots of students means lots of student politics (Photo: Hannah Awcock, Hope Street, 02/03/18).

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Another contentious issue which has particular resonance locally is fracking. There a quite a few possible sites for fracking in Lancashire, and some people are not happy about it. Frack Free Lancashire is a local campaign group, but as far as I’m aware they have not produced any protest stickers–yet (Photo: Hannah Awcock, Strand Road, 24/02/18).

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Not everyone in Preston is opposed to fracking, however; some think that the economic benefits outweigh the environmental risks. This is the first pro-fracking protest sticker I have ever found. The red rose of Lancashire is another powerful local symbol (Photo: Hannah Awcock, B6241, 26/05/2018).

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Along with anti-fascism and anarchism, animal rights is one of the most common topic of protest stickers, and Preston is no exception. I’d never heard of Stop Live Transport before, but their goal is fairly self-explanatory (Photo: Hannah Awcock, Foster Building, UCLan, 15/05/28).

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This sticker is very simple, but I think it is quite effective in getting it’s message across. Opponents of the dairy industry criticise it’s treatment of cows (Photo: Hannah Awcock, Water Lane, 24/05/18).

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Because of the similar style and message, and the fact that I found them close together, I think this sticker was produced by the same person/people as the previous one (Photo: Hannah Awcock, Watery Lane, 24/05/18).

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The Hunt Saboteurs Association has been campaigning against hunting since 1963 (Photo: Hannah Awcock, Flyde Road, 02/05/18).

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This sticker is more lighthearted than the previous one, but it shares the same message (Photo: Hannah Awcock, Blackpool Road, 22/05/18).

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In 2012-3, the Save Preston Bus Station Campaign fought to stop plans to demolish Preston Bus Station (PBS), a large brutalist building in the town centre that tends to provoke love-hate reactions. In September 2013, the building was granted Grade II listed status, and is currently undergoing redevelopment. I haven’t found any of these stickers left ‘in the wild,’ but one of my colleagues at UCLan was kind enough to give me this one (Photo: Hannah Awcock, 11/06/18).

London’s Protest Stickers: Vegetarianism and Veganism

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There were quite a few stickers relating to veganism and animal rights stuck on these phone boxes in Charing Cross Road (Photo: Hannah Awcock, Charing Cross Road, 23/03/17).

I have written about protest stickers related to animal welfare before, but I have since collected enough stickers to put together a post solely about vegetarianism and veganism. According to The Vegan Society, there are more than half a million vegans in the UK. Whilst this isn’t many, it’s more than three and a half times the number there was in 2006. There are also around 1.2 million vegetarians in the UK and the variety of vegan alternatives in shops and restaurants is increasing all the time. Whether it’s a fad or a lasting trend remains to be seen, but there are certainly plenty of protest stickers on the issue.

To see whereabouts in London I found these stickers, check out the Turbulent London Map.

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This sticker makes a connection between veganism and the environment, arguing that meat production contributes to global warming and pollution, amongst other things (Photo: Hannah Awcock, 14/02/17, Tate Modern).

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This sticker implies support of veganism rather than actually spelling it out. Rain has caused the ink to bleed, making quite a pretty pattern (Photo: Hannah Awcock, Charing Cross Road, 23/03/17).

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This sticker is disputing the argument that animals for the meat industry can be killed humanely (Photo: Hannah Awcock, Charing Cross Road, 23/03/17).

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This sticker targets the stereotypically British drink, tea, as a way of protesting the mass consumption of milk (Photo: Hannah Awcock, Charing Cross Road, 23/03/17).

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This sticker goes into more detail about the milk industry, portraying it as vicious and cruel (Photo: Hannah Awcock, Charing Cross Road, 23/03/17).

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This stickers builds on the arguments above by suggesting milks derived from alternative sources. The web address belongs to an organisation called Animals Deserve Absolute Protection Today and Tomorrow (ADAPTT–I suspect the name was chosen for the acronym rather than anything else), which promotes veganism and animal rights (Photo: Hannah Awcock, Charing Cross Road, 23/03/17).

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This sticker focuses on fish, listing characteristics seemingly intended to invoke sympathy. I suspect that most people would not normally associate these attributes with fish, and many vegetarians do eat fish (pescatarians) (Photo: Hannah Awcock, Charing Cross Road, 23/03/17).

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This sticker aims to persuade the viewer that veganism is healthy, suggesting that eating meat leads to higher rates of cancer. It also promotes a YouTube video, a particularly common tactic on animal rights stickers (Photo: Hannah Awcock, Charing Cross Road, 23/03/17).

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The key slogan of this sticker has been obscured, but it’s message is clear, condemning the attitude that human appetites are more important than the suffering of animals. It utilises another common tactic of animal rights stickers, photos of cute animals (Photo: Hannah Awcock, Pentonville Road, 23/03/17).

 

Protest Stickers: Plymouth

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Plymouth Hoe is a beautiful spot near the city centre, overlooking the sea (Photo: Hannah Awcock).

Plymouth is a city of a quarter of a million people on the south coast of Devon, close to the border with Cornwall. There has been a settlement there for hundreds of years, and the city has had some brushes with radicalism during that time. For example, the Pilgrim Fathers sailed from Plymouth for the New World (America), in 1620. They left because they were not allowed to practice their Puritan Calvinist beliefs in England. In  December 1913, Emmeline Pankhurst was due to be arrested as soon as she arrived back from the United States. The boat she was on was due to dock in Plymouth, and suffragettes descended on the city, determined to prevent this. Emmeline was arrested before the boat docked, and over the following months the city was targeted for revenge attacks of what were considered to be ‘cowardly’ arrest tactics. For the last century, the city has been an important site of naval shipbuilding. As such, it was targeted for aerial bombing during WW2, in what became known as the Plymouth Blitz. As a result significant parts of the town had to be rebuilt after the war, and there are few historic buildings in the town centre.

When I  visited the city recently, I found a wide variety of protest stickers, more than I would normally expect for a town of its size. Below are images of what I found.

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Charles Church is one of the few historic buildings that was left standing after the Plymouth Blitz. It is now a memorial to those who were killed during the bombing. (Photo: Hannah Awcock).

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I found several stickers around Plymouth imploring people not to vote Conservative. This one is making reference to the party’s support for fox hunting (Photo: Hannah Awcock).

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@sozfortheinconvenience is a Plymouth-based Instagram account that specialises in “fighting patriarchy and insulting people kindly one sticker at a time.” Personally, I am a big fan of polite sarcasm (Photo: Hannah Awcock).

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This sticker isn’t obviously associated with any specific protest group or organisation. Its bold text and bright colours are quite effective (Photo: Hannah Awcock).

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Earthlings is a 2005 documentary about the treatment of animals in factory farms, research labs, and other similar situations. It is often referenced on pro-Vegetarian/Vegan protest stickers (Photo: Hannah Awcock).

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This sticker argues against borders. It was produced by CrimethInc., an anarchist collective that promotes alternative thoughts and actions.  (Photo: Hannah Awcock).

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In contrast to the previous sticker, this one is promoting one of the most common pro-Brexit arguments, that it would give Britain the ability to ‘take back control’ of our government and our borders. Take Back Control organises pro-Brexit events in several locations around the country, including Plymouth (Photo: Hannah Awcock).

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There is a quote in A Knight’s Tale about how love should always end with hope. I think blog posts should end with hope every once in a while too (Photo: Hannah Awcock).

Sources and Further Reading

Rowbotham, Judith. “The Suffragettes and Plymouth.” Plymouth University. Last modified 5th November 2015, accessed 26th February 2018. Available at  https://www.plymouth.ac.uk/news/pr-opinion/the-suffragettes-and-plymouth

London’s Protest Stickers: Gender

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Stickers of all kinds are a common sight on the streets of London (Photo: Hannah Awcock, 12/03/15).

Gender-related issues and sexism have been hot topics of debate recently, thanks to campaigns such as #MeToo, and Time’s Up. #MeToo was a social media campaign to demonstrate the prevalence of sexual assault and harassment, with women sharing their own experiences to show just how common it is. The Times Up movement calls for an end to sexual harassment, assault and inequality in the film industry, developing in response to the Harvey Weinstein scandal. Many women wore back at the 2018 BAFTA awards to show their support. The campaign has also had an effect in the music industry, with attendees at the 2018 Brit awards showing their support by carrying white roses on the red carpet. This is a recent upsurge in an ongoing series of struggles to achieve gender equality that is reflected in London’s protest stickers.

To see where I found these stickers in the city, check out the Turbulent London Map.

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This sticker was produced by Revolutionary Socialists in the 21st Century. It is quite common on London’s streets (Photo: Hannah Awcock, Gordon Street, Bloomsbury, 12/03/15).

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This sticker connects feminism with anti-fascism. They two flags is the most common symbol of anti-fascism, and the phrasing of the sticker is also often associated with anti-fascist stickers; “Goodnight White Pride” is a particularly common phrase (Photo: Hannah Awcock, Albany Road, 02/04/15).

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Class War is an anarchist group that organises direct action against a society that it sees as deeply unequal. The Women’s Death Brigade is a branch of Class War with a feminist focus (Photo: Hannah Awcock, Euston Road, 05/09/15).

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Intersectionality is the idea that different aspects of a person (race, gender, sexuality etc.) do not exist separately from each other. Therefore, in order to solve issues such as sexism or racism, we need to combat all of them simultaneously, not just one. This sticker links sexism and homophobia, as well as representing Snow White in a more violent pose than we’re used to (Photo: Hannah Awcock, New Cross Road, 20/03/16).

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Sisters Uncut is a direct action campaign group formed to protest against cuts to domestic violence services in the UK. Research suggests that women are disproportionately affected by recent austerity, bearing more of the burden than men (Photo: Hannah Awcock, Lewisham Way, 20/03/16).

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One of Sisters Uncut’s best known tactics is crashing red carpets-they did it at the premier of the 2015 film Suffragette, and the 2018 BAFTA awards. The colours that Sisters Uncut use, white, green, and purple, echo those of the suffragette group the Women’s Social and Political Union (Photo: Hannah Awcock, Torrington Place, 20/10/15).

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This is arguably more of a poster than a sticker, but I liked it too much to leave it out. George Osborne was the Chancellor of the Exchequer between 2010 and 2016 (Photo: Hannah Awcock, 20/03/16 New Cross Road).

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Sexual consent has been another big issue for feminist campaigns in recent years. I Heart Consent is an educational consent campaign ran by the National Union of Students and Sexpression UK which focuses on universities and colleges (Photo: Hannah Awcock, Charing Cross Road, 23/03/17).

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This photo is a fantastic illustration of how the placement of a sticker can contribute to its meaning and impact (Photo: Hannah Awcock, King’s College London, 31/05/15).

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Unfortunately, feminism does not always present a united front. There is an ongoing debate over whether transgender women count as ‘real’ women, with some feminists arguing that transgender women cannot truly understand what it is like to deal with the prejudices faced by women. More generally, some people question whether or not is even possible to be genuinely transgender. This sticker is a reaction to such debates (Photo: Hannah Awcock, Victoria Station, 10/03/15)

Brighton’s Protest Stickers: Anti-Fascism

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There are lots of stickers in Brighton, of all kinds (Photo: Hannah Awcock, Queens Road, 02/04/17).

One of the most common themes of protest stickers is anti-fascism in pretty much every city I have visited (see London’s Protest Stickers: Anti-Fascism 1 and 2), and Brighton is no exception. There is a strong tradition of anti-fascism in the UK, inspired by events such as the Battle of the Cable Street (1936) and the Battle of Lewisham (1977). I have found anti-fascist stickers all over Brighton, some unique to the city, others that I have also found elsewhere. There is a local group called Brighton Anti-fascists, but the stickers I have found suggest that the city is also visited by a lot of other anti-fascist groups.

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Right wing groups often choose Brighton as a location for marches and demonstrations, probably because of its liberal reputation. They are almost always met by counter demonstrations (Photo: Hannah Awcock, Robertson Road, 08/07/16).

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Brighton Antifascists is the local anti-fascist group. This sticker features the city’s mascot, the seagull (Photo: Hannah Awcock, Churchill Square, 24/03/17).

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There are a large number of local anti-fascist groups around the country, many connected by the Anti-fascist Network. They frequently travel to other places in order to participate in demonstrations and events. When groups travel, they often put stickers up (Photo: Hannah Awcock, Trafalgar Square, 24/04/15).

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Some anti-fascist groups are not opposed to violence, as this sticker produced by the Leicester Antifascists demonstrates (Photo: Hannah Awcock, London Road, 24/12/16).

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The Clapton Ultras are an antifascist group of supporters of Clapham FC. They support the football team, working to keep football accessible, and participate in political campaigns (Photo: Hannah Awcock, Gloucester Place, 31/12/15).

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This sticker was produced by Berkshire Anti-fascists (Photo: Hannah Awcock, Brighton Station, 07/01/17).

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This sticker was also made by the Berkshire antifascists. The red flag of the anti-fascist logo has faded, which suggests that the sticker has been there for some time (Photo: Hannah Awcock, Providence Place, 25/10/16).

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The 161 Crew is a Polish anti-fascist group that has quite a strong presence in the UK (Photo: Hannah Awcock, Bartholomew Road, 04/02/17).

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This sticker is designed in a vintage style, which is quite unusual for anti-fascist stickers. Active Distribution sells a range anarchist products, including protest stickers. Disorder Rebel is a radical shop in Berlin (Photo: Hannah Awcock, York Place, 31/12/15).

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This sticker has no obvious producer. It is reminiscent of an aggressive neighbourhood watch sign (Photo: Hannah Awcock, Ann Street, 24/12/16).

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This sticker is imitating signs that encourage you to throw away litter. In this case, the litter is fascist groups like the English Defence League and the British National Party (Photo: Hannah Awcock, London Road, 31/12/15).

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Anti-fascism is not universally popular in Brighton. This is the first anti-anti-fascist sticker that I have ever found (Photo: Hannah Awcock, Queens Road, 03/12/16).

London’s Protest Stickers: Climate Change and the Environment

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This representation of the Extinction Symbol is a tile, so doesn’t technically count as a protest sticker, but I like this photo, so I decided to include it! (Photo: Hannah Awcock, South Bank, 03/08/16).

Environmental issues have been a focus of activists for decades, but campaigning specifically around the issue of climate change has only been going on since the 1990s. It has continued to gather momentum since then, however, although it seems to go through cycles of prominence amongst the general public. The recent BBC television series Blue Planet 2 has led to a significant backlash against the wasteful use of plastic, so I thought that now seemed like an appropriate time to look at climate change and environmental issues through the medium of protest stickers.

To see the location of these stickers, and all the protest stickers featured on this blog, check out the Turbulent London Map.

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A frequent refrain of animal rights campaigners is that animals are unable to speak out themselves, so humans must do it for them. This sticker echoes that sentiment. Climate Games was a period of concerted civil disobedience in protest against climate change in 2015 (Photo: Hannah Awcock, Malet Street, 20/10/15).

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Many people see climate change as inextricably linked to climate change–if we don’t change our dominant economic system, we cannot hope to halt climate change. The Alliance for Worker’s Liberty is a working class socialist group (Photo: Hannah Awcock, Euston, 15/04/15).

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The People’s March for Climate, Justice and Jobs took place in 2015, with an estimated turnout of 70,000 (although it is notoriously difficult to accurately estimate the numbers present at a protest). I really like the design of this sticker (Photo: Hannah Awcock, Malet Street, 17/11/15).

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Time to Act was another climate change march that took place in 2015. I went along to this march–you can see some of my photos here. I particularly like the request in the bottom right corner to “Please sticker responsibly”; I wonder what constitutes responsible stickering? (Photo: Hannah Awcock, King’s Cross Station, 11/03/15).

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EcoHustler is an independent online magazine that focuses on ecological concerns. Excessive consumerism is often held up as one of the causes of climate change and environmental damage. One frequently proposed solution is to buy less stuff (Photo: Hannah Awcock, King’s Cross Station, 06/06/15).

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This is another advert for EcoHustler, using the silhouette of Samuel L Jackson’s character from the 1994 film Pulp Fiction, Jules Winnfield (Photo: Hannah Awcock, Woburn Place, 15/04/15).

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Fossil Free UCL is a campaign to stop University College London from investing in the fossil fuel industry. I don’t really understand the retort, but it shows how protest stickers can spark political debate on the street (Photo: Hannah Awcock, Malet Street, 24/01/17).

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Fracking is one of the most controversial environmental issues of recent years, sparking resistance across Britain. This anti-fracking sticker has a particularly striking design (Photo: Hannah Awcock, Cable Street, 09/10/16).

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Stick it to the Tories is a stickering campaign by the People’s Assembly against Austerity. They produce protest stickers on a whole range of issues (Photo: Hannah Awcock, Little Venice, 01/05/16).

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Protest stickers are ephemeral objects–they are not meant to last forever. I think that this one was about fracking, but it is hard to tell (Photo: Hannah Awcock, Broad Sanctuary, 18/10/16).