London’s Protest Stickers: Anarchism 2

12-03-15 Euston Station

Stickers of all kinds are common on the streets of London (Photo: Hannah Awcock, 12/03/15).

Anarchist stickers are one of the most common categories of protest stickers you’ll find on the streets of London (you can see my previous post on the topic here). Some of the stickers promote anarchism in general, or celebrate prominent anarchist thinkers, whilst others promote specific groups. As with a lot of protest stickers, many of them have a sense of humour. Amongst the stickers below are examples of all of these types.

You can see where I found these protest stickers on the Turbulent London Map.

11-05-15 Great Dover Street (1)

This is one of my favourite protest stickers. I love the colours, and the way the children look so innocent, daubing their anarchist slogan onto the wall of the police station whilst the police officers are busy around the corner with the adults (Photo: Hannah Awcock, Great Dover Street, 11/05/15).

12-09-15 Brick Lane (2)

I had to read this sticker a few times, but once I figured out what it was actually saying, I thought it was pretty clever (Photo: Hannah Awcock, Brick Lane, 12/09/15).

sdr

The woman in this photo is Emma Goldman (1869-1940), the well-known activist and writer who played a key role in the development of anarchism in the first half of the twentieth century. This sticker is mocking the ‘Make America Great Again’ hats popularised by Donald Trump (Photo: Hannah Awcock, Cable Street, 12/09/17).

05-05-15 Heygate Street (2)

This sticker is celebrating Lucy Parsons (c.1853-1942). She was a labour organiser and anarcho-communist, well known for her public speaking skills. Her husband was one of the men executed as part of the 1887 Haymarket affair in Chicago. She went on to be a founding member of the International Workers of the World (IWW, otherwise known as the Wobblies)(Photo: Hannah Awcock, Heygate Street, 05/05/15).

09-10-16 St. George's Gardens (6)

Peter Kropotkin (1842-1921) was a Russian anarchist philosopher and geographer. He was imprisoned for his activism in 1874, but escaped and spent many years in exile. He was born into a aristocratic land-owning family, hence the reference to the musician Prince, who changed his stage name to an unpronouncable symbol in 1993 so was referred to as “The artist formerly known as Prince. He changed it back in 2000 (Photo: Hannah Awcock, St. George’s Gardens, 09/10/16).

dav

Mikhail Bakunin (1814-1876) is another influential figure in the history of anarchism. He is known as the founder of collectivist anarchism (Photo: Hannah Awcock, Gordon Street, 13/04/16).

09-10-16 St. George's Gardens (17)

This sticker also celebrates Bakunin, converting him into an anarchist Jack of spades. The web address in the bottom left of the sticker takes you to Libcom.org, a “resource for people who wish to fight to improve their lives.” (Photo: Hannah Awcock, St. George’s Gardens, 09/10/16).

dav

This sticker was produced by Anarchist Black Cross (ABC-their logo in on the bottom left of the sticker). The group supports prisoners, whether they are anarchists or not, in a range of ways including publishing prison guides, providing prisoners with political literature, and helping people write to prisoners (Photo: Hannah Awcock, Euston Road, 09/02/16).

dav

The Anarchist Federation (AFED) produce a LOT of protest stickers, and you see them quite often in London. A lot of their designs feature this style. The background is normally red and black, but the red ink on this sticker has faded over time (Photo: Hannah Awcock, Guildford Street, 10/01/17).

dav

This is probably a controversial message for some, but AFED believes that capitalism must be overthrown, and this can only be achieved through revolution by a unified working class (Photo: Hannah Awcock, 09/02/16)

dav

This sticker is quoting Emma Goldman’s 1911 book Marriage and Love (Photo: Hannah Awcock, St. Guildford Street, 10/01/17)

dav

Rebel City is the newspaper of the London branch of AFED. It seems that there hasn’t been an issue published since no. 7, in October 2017. I like the idea London as the rebel city, but I would argue it doesn’t need much help! (Photo: Hannah Awcock, Malet Street, 18/10/16).

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s